At the end of the presentation someone asked whether he thought

Byfeibisi Posted Nov 14, 2018

At the end of the presentation someone asked whether he thought

At the end of the presentation someone asked whether he thought they should do some market research

to see what customers wanted. “No,” he replied, “because customers don’t know what they want until

we’ve shown them.” Then he pulled out a device that was about the size of a desk diary.

 

“Do you want to see something neat?” When he flipped it open, it turned out to be a mock-up

of a computer that could fit on your lap, with a keyboard and screen hinged together like a notebook.

“This is my dream of what we will be making in the mid-to late eighties,” he said.

They were building a company that would invent the future.

 

York get this story and say, “We can’t make this guy Man of the Year.” That really

hurt. But it was a good lesson. It taught me to never get too excited about things

like that, since the media is a circus anyway. They FedExed me the magazine, and

I remember opening the package, thoroughly expecting to see my mug on the cover,

and it was this computer sculpture thing. I thought, “Huh?” And then I read

the article, and it was so awful that I actually cried.

In fact there’s no reason to believe that Moritz was jealous or that he intended his

reporting to be unfair. Nor was Jobs ever slated to be Man of the Year, despite what

he thought. That year the top editors (I was then a junior editor there) decided early

on to go with the computer rather than a person, and they commissioned, months in

advance, a piece of art from the famous sculptor George Segal to be a gatefold cover image.

Ray Cave was then the magazine’s editor. “We never considered Jobs,” he said. “

You couldn’t personify the computer, so that was the first time we decided to go

 

with an inanimate object.

We never searched

around for a face to

be put on the cover.”

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Byfeibisi Posted Nov 14, 2018

For the next two days there were presentations by various team

For the next two days there were presentations by various team leaders and the influential computer industry

analyst Ben Rosen, with a lot of time in the evenings for pool parties and dancing. At the end, Jobs stood in

front of the assemblage and gave a soliloquy. “As every day passes, the work fifty people are doing here is

 

going to send a giant ripple through the universe,” he said. “I know I might be a little hard to get along with,

but this is the most fun thing I’ve done in my life.” Years later most of those in the audience would be able to

laugh about the “little hard to get along with” episodes and agree with him that creating that giant

ripple was the most fun they had in their lives.

 

and let the personal computer move in,” the story proclaimed. It was a richly

reported piece, but also harsh at times—so harsh that Moritz (after he wrote a

book about Apple and went on to be a partner in the venture firm Sequoia

Capital with Don Valentine) repudiated it by complaining that his reporting had

noted that he “would occasionally burst into tears at meetings.” Perhaps the

best quote came from Jef Raskin. Jobs, he declared, “would have made an

excellent King of France.”

To Jobs’s dismay, the magazine made public the existence of the daughter he had

forsaken, Lisa Brennan. He knew that Kottke had been the one to tell the magazine

about Lisa, and he berated him in the Mac group work space in front of a half dozen

people. “When the Time reporter asked me if Steve had a daughter named Lisa, I said ‘

Of course,’” Kottke recalled. “Friends don’t let friends deny that they’re the father of a

child. I’m not going to let my friend be a jerk and deny paternity.

 

He was really angry

and felt violated and told

me in front of everyone

that I had betrayed him.”

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Byfeibisi Posted Nov 13, 2018

Another chart contained a koōan-like phrase that he later told

Another chart contained a koōan-like phrase that he later told

me was his favorite maxim: “The journey is the reward.” The Mac team,

he liked to emphasize, was a